No second spike in cyber attacks is 'encouraging': British minister

Claudine Rigal
Mai 19, 2017

The attack has hit at least 150 countries since Friday and infected 200,000 machines, according to the European law enforcement agency Europol.

"It was clear that warnings were given to hospital trusts but this is not something that focused on attacking the NHS here in the United Kingdom", she told reporters on Monday.

The trust, which runs Boston, Lincoln and Grantham hospitals, says to attend "unless patients recieve a telephone call" saying otherwise as some systems are still affected.

There is a more "complex emerging picture" of the cyber-attack that hit Britain's National Health Service - and other parts of the world - over the weekend.

Rudd was speaking after chairing a meeting in Whitehall, London, of the government's main emergency committee, known as Cobra.

"Bearing in mind the impact of the global cyber attack we would urge people to be patient with staff who may still be dealing with disruption to their systems".

Pictures posted on social media showed screens of NHS computers with images demanding payment of 300 USA dollars worth of the online currency Bitcoin, threatening to delete files within seven days.

Darien Huss, a senior security research engineer at Proofpoint, warned that "a new attack" was a major concern following the first cyber assault.

In total, more than 100,000 organisations in almost 100 countries have been attacked by the virus since Friday.

Security experts said a second wave of the attack could affect employees across the globe again, starting Monday and even spilling into the rest of the week.

Mr Smith, said the ransomware attacks used data stolen form NSA, containing information about software vulnerabilities.

'While all GP practices will have access to their clinical systems, not all computers in each practice may yet be back in full operation, however it is anticipated they will by the end of Tuesday'.

Problems with cyber security in NHS organisations were highlighted previous year by Dame Fiona Caldicott, the national data guardian, who warned that issues were given insufficient priority and that health bodies persisted in using obsolete computer systems, The Times said.

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