Jury selection to resume in Ohio police shooting retrial

Claudine Rigal
Juin 3, 2017

The judge in the racially charged murder retrial of a former OH police officer has issued a new order restricting media access in the proceeding.

Ghiz noted in her order Thursday that she will make a decision "in the near term" on requests for juror questionnaires. An appeals court ruled that Ghiz couldn't enforce the restrictions without an open-court hearing.

Jury selection for an OH police shooting retrial has resumed after the defense attorney asked to move it out of Cincinnati because of "a circus atmosphere".

She made one change to allow a fixed-position video camera during jury selection, placed so jurors can't be seen. Tensing has said he feared for his life when Sam DuBose, an unarmed black man, tried to drive away from a 2015 traffic stop.

Jury selection was halted Tuesday because of an ongoing legal dispute with news media organizations, including The Associated Press, over restrictions imposed by the judge.

Hamilton County Judge Leslie Ghiz cited responses to juror questionnaires in the racially charged murder retrial of Ray Tensing, a white former University of Cincinnati police officer facing charges of murder and voluntary manslaughter for the 2015 shooting of Sam DuBose, an unarmed black man.

Efforts to seat a jury for an OH police shooting retrial are set to resume after the judge said many potential jurors are "seriously concerned" about their safety if their names become known.

She said she plans to rule soon on media access issues, and also plans to resume jury selection Friday.

Jury selection for an OH police shooting retrial has resumed after the defense asked to move it out of Cincinnati, citing "a circus-like atmosphere".

Hamilton County Judge Leslie Ghiz (giz) on Tuesday released potential jurors for the murder retrial of Ray Tensing, a white former University of Cincinnati police officer. Ghiz is determined to keep the case in Cincinnati and has assured potential jurors she's trying to protect their privacy.

News media attorney Jack Greiner filed a challenge Friday with a state appeals court, saying the new order violates First Amendment freedoms.

D'autres rapports CampDesrEcrues

Discuter de cet article

SUIVRE NOTRE JOURNAL