Papers to outline Government's aims ahead of Brexit talks

Evrard Martin
Août 13, 2017

The British government is fighting back against criticism that it is divided and unprepared for Brexit, announcing it will publish a set of detailed proposals on customs arrangements, the status of the Ireland-Northern Ireland border and other issues.

The EU says those negotiations can't start until sufficient progress has been made on three initial issues: how much money the United Kingdom will have to pay to leave the bloc; whether security checks and customs duties will be instituted on the Irish border; and the status of EU nationals living in Britain.

The disclosure comes as Mr Davis prepares to embark on a third round of talks with the EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier in the Belgian capital at the end of August.

Opening rounds of talks with Brussels have made little headway, with European Union negotiators demanding greater clarity from the British delegation.

Ireland's premier Leo Varadkar meanwhile has expressed his frustration at the failure so far of the UK Government to come up with firm proposals to ensure that there is no return to the "hard" border between the North and the Republic. The EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, warned EU ambassadors last month that the lack of progress meant talks on the future relationship with the United Kingdom, including a free-trade agreement, may not be possible by the next leader's summit in October, and may have to extended.

On his first official visit to Northern Ireland earlier this month, the Taoiseach even put forward his own suggestions for a "soft Brexit" - including the possibility of creating a new EU-UK customs union.

Eager to push talks past the opening divorce issues and on to the future trading and legal ties to the bloc, Britain also promised a series of "Future Partnership" papers in the run-up to October's European Council.

"I've launched this process because with time of the essence, we need to get on with negotiating the bigger issues around our future partnership to ensure we get a deal that delivers a strong United Kingdom and a strong EU". "It's what businesses across Europe have called on both sides to do and will demonstrate that the U.K.is ready for the job".

D'autres rapports CampDesrEcrues

Discuter de cet article

SUIVRE NOTRE JOURNAL